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With this speech I would like to draw the attention of the public on a matter that is very close to us, as Italians and Europeans, although less known among the majority of the people and often wrongly covered with exoticism.

I want to deal with the case of the so called “non-citizens” in two European Baltic States: Estonia and Latvia.

Ministerial Meeting on Mega Events for Sustainable Tourism Development, a forum dedicated to the impact of major events on the sector of economy, convened in Sochi  recently. No doubt, there were serious, in some regards, symbolic reasons behind nominating the city as a site for

Debts after the collapse of the country of Yugoslavia into independent states grew 4.5 fold: from 20 to 90 billion Euros. An article in the Slovenian newspaper "Diary" recently covered this. The new countries in the Balkans are in a debt trap from which they will not be able to escape for a very long time.

Slovenia became a champion - a member of the EU since May 2004. Today, the debt of this “country on the sunny side of the Alps” is 28.8 billion Euros. However, in Ljubljana this is not viewed as a particular cause for concern. The Government believes that Slovenia’s economic potential can repay the loans on time. The population finds it difficult to believe in such optimism. After all, the interest debt is growing every day. Leading economists estimate that by the end of 2014 Slovenia will owe the IMF and other lending institutions in Europe, 81 per cent of its GDP.

The outcome of the French municipal elections of March 2014 and the European elections of May 2014 will require action from France’s government  for the rest of Hollande’s charge.

Two events embody and manifest the present state of France: the national municipal elections of March 23 and 30, and the European elections of May 22-25, 2014.

First, if the French municipal elections of March 23 and 30 have given one clear indication of what to expect from the three years remaining of President François Hollande’s tenure, it is that the galloise left is in full retreat. The Parti Socialiste (PS) under François Hollande lost the French municipal elections of March 2014 in a landslide due to mismanagement, unaltered bureaucracy, and authoritarian behavior. Their defeat was also due to their failure to accomplish the reforms promised during the 2012 presidential election campaign. It indirectly also empowered its opponent, the radical right of the anti-European and ultra right Front National (FN) led by Marine Le Pen. Front National scored up to 47 percent in cities like Béziers in Southern France, gained twelve city mayors as well as 1,546 and 459 councilors at two different levels of local government, and was installed as third-largest party of France. Other cities conquered by FN were Reims, Quimper, and Angers. A jubilant Le Pen stated that “this is the greatest success in our history.”