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Certainly Britain is entering a new phase of its historical development after Brexit. London has to shift its relations with the outer world and to come forward as an independent player from the EU. Institute of Commonwealth Studies Director, Professor Phillip Murphy was interviewed by «International Affairs» journal about perspectives of the UK’s foreign policy.
Mr Minister,
Ladies and gentlemen,
First of all, I would like to thank the leadership of the University of Piraeus for conferring an honorary doctorate upon me. A great deal has been said about me and I have learned a great many new things about myself. Thank you anyway. Your university is known in Russia as one of Greece’s leading centres of higher education that trains first-rate specialists. It is all the more flattering for me that your institution has expanded the ranks of its professors emeritus with your humble servant.
Question: My first question is about Yevgeny Primakov’s decision to turn the plane around in mid-flight [over the Atlantic]. I must admit that I don’t completely agree with the way we highlight this decision as the focal point and possibly even a symbolic element in his career. What was the meaning behind this turn-around? What did it change?

Vladislav INOZEMTSEV

Russia's Economic Modernization: The Causes of a Failure

Russie.Nei.Visions No. 96, September 2016

 

In this short study of attempts that have been made in recent years to modernise the Russian economy, the author explains why they have all ended in failure. Unlike most experts, he focuses on politics and ideology. He stresses that the idea of modernisation runs counter to the historical vision that is now propagated by the Russian leadership, to the system of governance that it has chosen and to Russia’s current path of isolation from the West. In his view, such political choices have rendered modernisation of the Russian economy unfeasible. The author also points to other problems: the effects of privatisation, which have made investment in new industrial facilities unprofitable, the declining quality of business leaders who are chosen for their political loyalty and the lack of independent big businesses that could insist on reforms being carried out.

Vladislav Inozemtsev is a Russian economist, Doctor of economic science and the founder and director of the Centre for the Study of Post-industrial Society (founded 1996).

Question: Excellent. Well, thank you very much for joining me on BBC World News. I think I have to start this interview by discussing with you the situation in Aleppo. We’ve seen the ferocious bombardment, your warplanes working alongside those of the Syrian military. Four hundred and more people have been killed, including many children. The UN Special Envoy says that there is evidence that war crimes may have been committed. Why are you doing this?
Mr Ambassador, Mr Kurinnoy, Mr Leonov, friends,
I am pleased to welcome all the guests of this celebration of an important date − the 90th birthday of the leader of the Cuban Revolution Fidel Castro. First of all, I would like to express my gratitude to the Russian Society of Friendship with Cuba and the Cuban Embassy in Moscow for their assistance in organising this event.
A PART OF THE WESTERN WORLD, Europe, however, has been very selective about alien cultures and civilizations; not a "melting pot" American style, it is paying dearly for this function imposed on it. The disagreements on the migration issues in the European corridors of power threaten the cohesion of the European Unity. Frau Merkel who demonstrated a no mean determination to meet a new wave of migrants with maximal openness and tolerance had already accepted the failure of mul-ticulturalism. This means that Berlin has no answer to the question about how to cope with the migrants who have arrived in thousands and millions to Europe to stay.
Question: Cuba and Russia have experienced various periods in their relations, including a romantic perception of the Cuban revolution, followed by the Caribbean Crisis that cooled off bilateral relations somewhat. From what we were told, Fidel Castro was offended when his opinion was not sought as Nikita Khrushchev and John F. Kennedy made decisions. Khrushchev tried to patch up relations during Castro’s visit to the Soviet Union in 1963, and then relations began to develop more or less normally. Russia was struggling in 1991, but so was Cuba. What is happening today?
I’d like to thank the Valdai Club for its attention to the urgent issues of world politics.

I think that the authoritative audience that gathered here, just as at the club’s previous events, is highly interested in seeking opportunities to improve Russia-West relations.

Among Russia’s strategic priorities, Asia traditionally played a secondary role compared to the West. In the mid-1990s, then Foreign Minister Yevgeny Primakov initiated a rapprochement with China and India. Then, in 2014, deteriorating relations between Russia and the West prompted Moscow to begin its "great pivot to the East”.