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INTERETHNIC CLASHES are not a rarity for many Asian and African countries, and foreign media outlets do not sensationalize them. However, what has happened around the Rohingya community in Myanmar in recent months has largely broken with this pattern. TV screens and newspaper pages have been filled with reports of the purported genocide of the Rohingya perpetrated by the Myanmar authorities: thousands of dead Rohingya, hundreds of burned villages, and thousands of refugees fleeing to Bangladesh.
Romania’s policy in the Black Sea region is aimed at creating strategic prerequisites for Bucharest to achieve long-term regional leadership. Russia is the only Black Sea country, which does not fit into the geopolitical landscape being built by Bucharest. It is a country with which Romania, as a member of the EU and NATO, is not bound by allied treaties. Therefore, Romania views Russia as an obstacle to its plans, and its policy is aimed at getting this hurdle out of the way.
Two statements, almost simultaneously released by the Russia’s Foreign and Defense Ministries, once again raised the issue which, although rarely mentioned, is considered a “silent threat.” On September 25, Vladimir Yermakov, director of the Foreign Ministry’s Department of Non-Proliferation and Arms Control, told the media that Russia will not allow biological experiments to be carried out on its borders by the Americans.
RIVALRIES AND CONFRONTATIONS between states in the information space are a feature of today's international relations. Information is becoming one of the priority instruments in fighting for global domination. We agree with experts who believe that there exist two principal forms of information warfare, technological and psychological, the former targeting information systems and communication channels and the latter, people's minds and public opinion.
The recent turmoil over Idlib has pushed the developments in Syrian Kurdistan out of political and mass media spotlight. However, it’s Idlib that will most likely host the final act of the drama, which has become known as the “civil war in Syria”.
IN RECENT YEARS, much has been said about radicalism and its varied offshoots. True, the number of terrorist acts climbs up, the popularity of extreme right political forces grows, and the wave of left radical and anti-globalist movements, migration crises and international tension is rising. This is how everyday realities look in many countries of the world.
Orange juice, jam and biscuits are on the table for a working breakfast served for the foreign ministers of the five permanent members of the UN Security Council. Seated to either side of Sergey Lavrov are Foreign Minister of France Jean-Yves Le Drian (whom the Russian Foreign Minister was scheduled to meet one-on-one in the afternoon) and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi (the meeting with him was yesterday, like with UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres).
Russia and NATO are long-standing antagonists, even though the possibility of our country's accession to the North Atlantic Alliance was raised back in the days of President Clinton. Before that, the Soviet Union proposed the same in a note to that effect in 1954. Is genuine partnership possible now when NATO is expanding eastward and conducting large-scale exercises on our western borders, and the Alliance's military spending has been on the rise for several years in a row?
Before the start of the 73rd Session of the UN General Assembly, the United Nations’ official website published a number of interesting stories, one of which said that the president’s gavel, an inalienable part of official UN meetings which declares the beginning and end of meetings and the approval of the agenda or resolutions, was made of Icelandic pear wood in 2005. The choice fell on the wood from that country because the Althing, the “grandfather” of all modern parliaments, was convened in 930 in Iceland.
This autumn the Moscow art calendar is rich as ever and art lovers may find the Russian capital one of the hottest destinations. The State Tretyakov Gallery shows a moving retrospective by Ilya and Emilia Kabakov: “Not Everyone Will Be Taken Into the Future” and the exhibition of the world-famous avant-garde artist Mikhail Larionov while the Pushkin Museum of Fine Art presents “Masterpieces of Edo Paintings and a Japanese installation artist Tadashi Kawamata.