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Though geographically the revolution-ridden North Africa and North Eastern Asia are far from each other, many analysts draw parallels and even come up with forecasts about similar fates of the leaders of Jamahiriya and North Korea. The current events in Libya put the following question – Does a small country have the right to conduct its independent policy in the modern world, regardless of the approval of the global ruling class and without running a risk to be punished for that?

On April 10, in an interview with a CNN host and political observer Fareed Zakaria, the former secretary of state James Baker, when he was speaking about the current global changes, said the following: “The biggest challenge facing the U.S. isn’t turmoil in the Arab world. It’s our debt bomb”.  He said that without a strong dollar the US will turn into the United States of Greece.

The parliamentary elections, held in Finland on April 17, were marked by an unprecedented success of the True Finns, which is regarded as a nationalist party. According to the preliminary results, the True Finns have received 19% of votes and increased their representation at the parliament to 39 from only 5 seats in comparison with 2007.

More than ever over the past decade, geopolitics watchers whose approach to international developments is - in line with the projections made by founders of the school of thought N.Ya. Danilevsky, O. Spengler, and A.J. Toynbee - premised in the assumption that distinct civilizations will overshadow countries and ethnic groups as the actual players in global politics can say that reality is generating ample evidence to confirm the concept.

The BRICS summit will convene in China's Sanya beach resort on April 14. For the first time in the alliance's relatively short history, South Africa will participate in the forum as a  member along with Brazil, Russia, India, and China, while the disquieting political settings of the early 2011 reinforce the world's interest in the coming talks between the leaders of the emerging economic heavyweights.

On March 31, a group of developing countries — Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, Cuba, Nicaragua, Cambodia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Mali, Equatorial Guinea, etc. - called the UN Security Council to impose a ceasefire on Libya and to take urgent steps to settle the conflict in and around the country. Talks between M. Gadhafi and the rebels are supposed to be the first phase of the peace process.

This year started with a wave of social uprising in Maghrib, which later spread to the most part of the Arab North Africa and the Middle East.

Though historical significance of these events will become clear only with time, now we still can make some conclusions and see what these outbreaks of protest had in common. If we have a look at how the western mass media cover the opposition protests in North Africa and the Middle East, we will unintentionally get suspicious about similarity of the way it was done.

The way the European Commission react on the nuclear disaster at Fukushima-1 nuclear power plant in Japan does not coincide with the common idea of clumsiness of the European bureaucracy machine. The decisions to carry out stress-tests of Europe’s nuclear power plants and to elaborate new nuclear security standards were made on a timely basis. A wide discussion is under way at the level of industry’s experts how the energy sector in Europe should develop further considering the Japanese experience. 

The situation in Libya is evidently headed for a quagmire.  At the moment, the vision of the situation should not be limited to the viewpoint of the Western coalition's member countries (which remain divided over quite a few key issues and whose governments will yet endure fiery criticism over the campaign from their respective constituencies) but should encompass the wider context of the post-revolutionary Arab world.

A death sentence to Libya's sovereignty was handed out long before the protests inspired by Western intelligence services shook the country and the UN Security Council responded to the situation with anti-Libyan resolutions. There are fundamental causes behind the strategy aimed at ruining Libya. Years ago, it was designated as a target by the architects of the new world order, and the air raids against Libya were just a matter of time.