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Libya is at the epicenter of the crisis unfolding across the Arab world. The anti-Gadhafi protests which broke out in February promptly escalated into an armed uprising. Rebels gained control over Libya's eastern provinces, the key city of Benghazi, and a number of Mediterranean centers. Parts of Libya's armed forces and some of its envoys supposed to represent it in other countries and in the UN switched their loyalty to the rebels.

A wave of anti-government protests in the Arab world has made us think about whether such events are possible in other parts of the planet. Then Central Asia comes to mind immediately as a region which has much in common with the Arab civilization. The leaders of Central Asian regions do not seem to rule out the possibility of social unrest among their people. Any kind of information about the ongoing crisis in the Arab world receives poor coverage in the local media and is always censored.

A typical technology of deception is to tell the truth, but not the whole truth. The coverage of the recent catastrophes at Japan's Fukushima 1 and Fukushima 2 nuclear power plants seems to be built on the above principle.

The statement made by NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen that the alliance is not going to launch an operation in Libya without UN blessing grabbed the headlines. Rasmussen did voice extreme concern over the situation in the country and expressed the view that the steps taken by Gadhafi's regime bordered with crimes against humanity.

Overwhelmed with the outbursts of white noise which accompanied the New START ratification, for a period of time the Russian diplomacy seemed oblivious to Washington's missile defense plans, including those pertinent to the European part of the missile shield.

On February 9, the UN Security Council passed a resolution confirming the outcome of the referendum in Sudan which by 98.83% of the vote established its southern part as an independent state. The new country will be officially welcomed to the map of the world on July 9. An array of issues including border demarcation, citizenship, security measures, and assets sharing await resolution in the meantime. 

An act of self-immolation by a Tunisian street vendor in protest of the confiscation of his wares by municipal officials in December was covered in the media as the catalyst for mass riots in Tunisia, which later spread to Egypt, Yemen, Iran, Algeria, Bahrain, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Djibouti, Morocco.

The reason why the abstract concept of unity based on diversity did not withstand the test of empirical reality is that it obviously had nothing to do with reality from the outset. Dissenting voices of those who put national interests higher on the agenda than the cause of integration are increasingly audible even in Europe which must be credited with having generated over ages the moral and legal norms more or less common to all of its peoples and becoming the cradle of what used to be the world's most respected culture.

The revolt in Libya makes us seriously revise our attitude to the events in the Arab East. A widespread point of view that the Internet was to blame for creating options for self-organization has been shaken.

Indeed, the Internet opens opportunities for political mobilization and creation of mass movements, but in any case this is only the channel through which different social groups promote their interests.

The themes of oil and blood are interwoven in the recent developments in Libya. The country's oil reserves are estimated at 46.4 billion barrels and its oil export generates impressive revenues which are generously dispensed to prop up the living standards of the 6 million population. As of 2010, the annual par capita GDP in Libya measured slightly under $19,000.