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I recently re-visited Serbia on a business trip. In Belgrade, as usual, the people live a modest life. The only pleasure which the Serbs have never denied themselves, and apparently will not give up, is a chat over a cup of coffee in the numerous and very cozy cafes . They are always

I think the Geneva meeting was a belated realization of something the ex-president Viktor Yanukovich suggested doing back in November 2013, when the first scandals around his refusal to sign the Associsation Agreement with the EU erupted. At the time (which looks like a distant epoche now) he suggested TRILATERAL negotiations between Ukraine, the EU and Russia, to sort out all the differences. The EU then refused, saying that Russia was one party too many at the talks. The coup d'etat, the takeover of Crimea and the Ukrainian East's own Maidan became consequences of this refusal to (tri)dialogue. In Geneva, there was not only a trilateral meeting, but one more important party joined - the United States. But there is agian one more party still missing - the representatives of the East Ukrainian protesters. This time, Russia suggested their participation and the US said it was one party too many. That means that the protest in Eastern Ukraine will continue, since the grievances of these people won't be addressed. (Why? Because the registered desire of the Geneva meeting to "disarm all the illegal armed formations" will be interpreted by the Ukrainian government as being directed against the pro-Russian protesters in the East in the first place. And the promise of "inclusive" constitution is too vague to include what the protesters want - federalization and more rights for the Russian language). By refusing to see the REAL grievances of Russian-speaking Ukrainians (and Russians before them), the Western partners of Ukraine multiply the number of aggrieved parties. And each time they finally agree to let the "unloved" party to access the talks (like they agreed to invite the Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov to Geneva), it is already too late. By that time, the situation degenerates further, with new aggrieved sides appearing in bad need to have their voice at the talks (again denied by the EU and the US). The conflict in the East of Ukraine won't stop, until the Western parties learn to see it as a genuine protest and not a Russian “incursion.”

Ukrainian Government Retakes Buildings Occupied by Secessionists

 

Top News: The Ukrainian government in Kiev said this morning that they had regained control over government buildings seized yesterday by pro-Russian separatists in Kharkiv. Government buildings in the eastern

The main core of the book Af-Pak: the challenge of stability (Francesco Brunello Zanitti, Af-Pak: la sfida della stabilità, Fuoco Edizioni/IsAG, Rome 2014) is the presentation of future hypothetical scenarios of Afghanistan and Pakistan, considering ISAF’s withdrawal

The causes of Moscow’s action in the Ukrainian crisis are much more complicated than that represented by the stereotypical analysis in the Western media and academic circles.

The dominant discourse in the U.S. and Europe is a consensus that the Kremlin is commanded by one man

On March 27th, 1999 in Brussels, the NATO leadership could not believe what they were hearing. For the first time in the history of its combat operations, a highly "secret" U.S. Air Force stealth fighter plane was not only detected by Yugoslavian air defense radar, but it was also shot out of the sky and came down near Belgrade. It was a heavy blow to the American military-industrial complex and the Lockheed Corporation. The Pentagon claimed that there had been a technical problem and the so-called "invisible plane" had simply crashed somewhere in the forests of Serbia. It was not until 25th November 1999 that the U.S. military admitted that the F117a had been shot down and destroyed. The truth was concealed not only from ordinary Americans, but also from numerous customers.

The Chairman of the Federation Council, Valentina Matviyenko, talked about sanctions by the White House, the possible appearance of Maidan protests in other countries, and the Crimean referendum.

The Chairman of the Federation Council, Valentina Matviyenko, spoke in an

The light was burning day and night in the office of the Consul General of the Russian Federation in Crimea, Vyacheslav Svetlichny, in the days leading up to the referendum, and it seemed like it was never switched off. "Yes, it’s true; there was little time for sleeping.

President of Russia Vladimir Putin: Federation Council members, State Duma deputies, good afternoon. Representatives of the Republic of Crimea and Sevastopol

These are nervous times for the international community. There are serious tensions between Ukraine and Russia, with a constant risk of a miscalculation in the situation. The actions of a single “hot head” could have dire consequences for the region as a whole, and the possibility of the breakup of the Ukraine is certainly not out of the question. But what is the British perspective on the situation?