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On March 27th, 1999 in Brussels, the NATO leadership could not believe what they were hearing. For the first time in the history of its combat operations, a highly "secret" U.S. Air Force stealth fighter plane was not only detected by Yugoslavian air defense radar, but it was also shot out of the sky and came down near Belgrade. It was a heavy blow to the American military-industrial complex and the Lockheed Corporation. The Pentagon claimed that there had been a technical problem and the so-called "invisible plane" had simply crashed somewhere in the forests of Serbia. It was not until 25th November 1999 that the U.S. military admitted that the F117a had been shot down and destroyed. The truth was concealed not only from ordinary Americans, but also from numerous customers.

The Chairman of the Federation Council, Valentina Matviyenko, talked about sanctions by the White House, the possible appearance of Maidan protests in other countries, and the Crimean referendum.

The Chairman of the Federation Council, Valentina Matviyenko, spoke in an

The light was burning day and night in the office of the Consul General of the Russian Federation in Crimea, Vyacheslav Svetlichny, in the days leading up to the referendum, and it seemed like it was never switched off. "Yes, it’s true; there was little time for sleeping.

President of Russia Vladimir Putin: Federation Council members, State Duma deputies, good afternoon. Representatives of the Republic of Crimea and Sevastopol

These are nervous times for the international community. There are serious tensions between Ukraine and Russia, with a constant risk of a miscalculation in the situation. The actions of a single “hot head” could have dire consequences for the region as a whole, and the possibility of the breakup of the Ukraine is certainly not out of the question. But what is the British perspective on the situation?

Recent weeks brought up one of the hottest topics for discussion within the decades, especially in the West – the crisis over Ukraine. Hundreds if not thousands of articles that analyze the whole situation around this Eastern European country have been published. The vast majority of those analyses is concentrated on Russian aggression (invasion, occupation) against Ukraine, on condemnation of whatever Russia is doing or is planning to do, and on how grave is this challenge to the international order.

International Affairs Magazine: “Dear Mr. Scholar, what are the main challenges currently facing our country, what is lacking for the active development of trade and economic

The Federation Council presented its next Annual Report of the Integration Club under the Chairman of the Federation Council to the professional community and journalists. The Integration Club today is an informal but at

The International Business Forum "Doing Business with Russia”, was a notable event in Sacramento, the capital of California. Participants at the roundtable discussions included official representatives of the Russian Federation, the federal government and the U.S. State of California, as well as the leadership of American trade associations and members of the business community. One meeting was attended by a correspondent from the Slavic Sacramento news portal (SlavicSac.com), Ruslan Gurzhiy. We offer you his work.

An interview with the Chairman of the Union of Oil and Gas Producers of Russia, Yuri Shafranik.

 

“Mr. Shafranik, how do you assess the prospects for production of hydrocarbons in the Mediterranean Sea shelf?”

“The Mediterranean covers a large area. The offshore areas of Egypt, Israel, Lebanon, Syria, Cyprus and Turkey are a subject of wide interest. They are definitely attractive, but we can’t talk about the prospects earlier than when the first wells start to produce oil and gas in a few years time.