Editor's Column
Golden Collection
Infographics
Experts
MFA Russia News
All Tags
Archive material
June 2019 (23)
May 2019 (24)
April 2019 (28)
March 2019 (23)
February 2019 (28)
January 2019 (22)
rss
facebook
twitter
youtube
The twists and turns of political developments in the Middle East largely stem from the rivalry between Saudi Arabia, Iran and Turkey. While Iran seeks greater influence in countries with significant Shiite populations, Turkey and Saudi Arabia are sparring on one territory, both claiming leadership in the Sunni world: Turkey by “birthright,” and Saudi Arabia – by the “right of the strongest,” i.e. of the most economically advanced actor boasting the strongest army in the region.
Turkey’s planned purchase of the S-400 missile defense system from Russia threatens NATO security and is putting Ankara at risk of losing its status of “a critical partner in the most successful military alliance in history,” US Vice President Mike Pence has warned. Experts from the Turkish Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research (SETA) participating in a panel discussion, organized by the Valdai Discussion Club in Moscow, spoke about the problems currently existing between Turkey and the United States as well as their country’s cooperation with Russia.
The breakthrough in trade and other economic relations between Russia and Turkey has quite naturally spread to the realm of politics, best reflected in the two countries’ coordinated actions in Syria. This is all the more surprising, since only recently military-technical cooperation between Moscow and Ankara was absolutely unthinkable. Wary of this trend, members of the Western antiterrorist coalition fighting ISIL (a terrorist organization banned in Russia) have been working hard to “tear off” Turkey from Russia, with mass media spearheading this effort.
The Syrian conflict was high on the agenda of a conference on the problems of the Middle East and Africa, which was recently held at the Russian Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Oriental Studies in Moscow. The participants pointed to the external aspect as the main factor in the conflict, with Boris Dolgov, a senior researcher at the Center for Arab and Islamic Studies, describing the Syrian crisis as a result of the US model of globalization.

Elementary arithmetic routinely holds keys to much more complex political algebra. At the moment, for example, it appears that fairly simple regards explain the bizarre conduct of the Arab League which, contrary to reasonable expectations, alligned itself with the West in destabilizing Syria and keeping B. Assad under pressure.