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The exhibition “Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and the School of London’’ that opened at the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow last week, has all chances to become a serious crowd-puller. For the first time, the Russian public has an opportunity to get acquainted with a unique and very important chapter in the history of modern British art. Despite the worldwide fame of most of the masters, whose names are usually associated with the so-called London School, monographs of Francis Bacon were held in Russia, but only occasionally single works by Lucian Freud, Frank Auerbach, Leon Kossoff were exhibited. The current exhibition is to bridge this gap.
While ties between India and Russia continue to scale newer heights following an informal summit last year, more and more Indians are being exposed to rich Russian culture. The spacious exhibition halls of Lalit Kala Akademi in Kota (Rajasthan) was the last venue hosting a moving art symposium “Opening Russia-2019”, which took place in January - February in several cities of Rajasthan, West Bengal and, of course, in the capital of India – Delhi, where the two-month art marathon started at Arpana Fine Arts Gallery at the very end of December.
The official presentation of the Nadja Brykina Foundation was held in mid-January in the gallery space in central Moscow where since 2010 Nadja Brykina Gallery has hosted numerous retrospectives and solo shows of the Nonconformist artists of the 1960s-80s as well as artists of the younger generation. The Foundation marked its opening with an exhibition which presents works by Vladimir Andreenkov, Francisco Infante, Alexei Kamensky, Andrey Krasulin, Boris Otarov, Sergey Potapov, and Yuri Zlotnikov to name a few – all of them are gallery artists with whom it has been working for over 20 years.
Muscovites have long got used that every December, the darkest month of the year, one of the city's central squares across from the Bolshoi Theatre, is brightly lit not only by a huge Christmas tree, but also by the Grand menorah traditionally installed for Hanukkah when Jews around the world celebrate the Festival of Lights and the miracle of the temple’s menorah burning brightly for eight full days. It has been over 25 years now, since it was first publically celebrated in Moscow in the 1990-s.
The star-sprinkled blue onion domes peppering the peaceful rural landscape, cozy wooden houses along a winding street and the beautiful Russian fortress of Alexandrovsky Kremlin are staring at you from the canvases showcased at Jawaharlal Nehru Cultural Center to the Embassy of India in Russia in Moscow, hosting the exhibition “Temples of Spirit: India and Russia” till the end of November.