Editor's Column
Golden Collection
Infographics
Experts
MFA Russia News
All Tags
Archive material
November 2019 (12)
October 2019 (24)
September 2019 (20)
August 2019 (26)
July 2019 (25)
June 2019 (25)
rss
facebook
twitter
youtube
It does not happen too often that a museum exhibition becomes not only a notable art event of the season but also a moving personal story that a visitor cannot miss. It is exactly the case with the show “Vertical - Horizontal: Richard Paul Lohse - Vladimir Andreenkov” currently hosted by the Schusev State Museum of Architecture with the support of Swiss Embassy in Russia, Pro Helvetia Moscow and Nadja Brykina Foundation. The project is dedicated to the 45th anniversary of the meeting of a Swiss artists and architect Richard Paul Lohse (1902–1988) and the Soviet nonconformist graphic artist Vladimir Andreenkov (born 1930).
​The14th Chekhov International Theatre Festival, the largest theatre event of a kind in Russia, is in full swing. Better known to a broader audience in the country and beyond under the name of the Chekhovsky Festival, it has long become an integral part of the international cultural dialogue: every other summer since 1992 various Moscow venues host crème de la crème of the world theatre across genres and formats. Running through the summer until the end of July, this year festival’s programme includes 22 stage productions of different genres from 15 countries, including Argentina, Belarus, Great Britain, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, Russia, Taiwan, France, South Africa and Japan.​
The spectacular first-ever solo show of Max Ernst's paintings in Russia opened in the Twelve-Column Hall of the New Hermitage and will be running throughout the summer granting visitors the opportunity to admire works of Ernst from his so called “first French period”. At the core of the exhibition are approximately 20 paintings and works on paper - collages, drawings, and prints - from the 1920s on, marking Ernst’s passage from avant-garde experimentation to proto-Surrealism. This period was brief - a little over a decade - but played a decisive role in Ernst’s artistic output.
​The State Tretyakov Gallery presents a long-anticipated retrospectiveby the world-famous Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, the founder of expressionism in European painting. The scope of the show is unprecedented: the exposition located at two floors of the Engineering Building includes 64 paintings, 37 graphic works as well as photos and memorial objects from the Munch Museum in Oslo that houses the largest collection of the master’s heritage.
Every summer, guests and music aficionados from more than 80 countries around the globe flock to the Austrian city of Salzburg to experience the best that the opera and drama world have to offer, alongside a legendary concert programme. In the summer of 2019, over the course of five weeks (July 20 to August 31), Salzburg will host 199 performances spread across 16 venues around the city. On March 23, the programme of the 2019 Salzburg Festival was presented at the residence of the Austrian ambassador in Moscow.
The exhibition “Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and the School of London’’ that opened at the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow last week, has all chances to become a serious crowd-puller. For the first time, the Russian public has an opportunity to get acquainted with a unique and very important chapter in the history of modern British art. Despite the worldwide fame of most of the masters, whose names are usually associated with the so-called London School, monographs of Francis Bacon were held in Russia, but only occasionally single works by Lucian Freud, Frank Auerbach, Leon Kossoff were exhibited. The current exhibition is to bridge this gap.
The Moscow Museum of Modern Art presents an extensive solo show of Jaan Toomik, a world-famous video artist, painter and film director, often described as Estonia's most brilliant figure on the world art scene. The exhibition at 10 Gogolevsky boulevard entitled 'My End Is My Beginning. And My Beginning Is My End' features paintings, sculpture, short films and video art created over the last 20 years.
The official presentation of the Nadja Brykina Foundation was held in mid-January in the gallery space in central Moscow where since 2010 Nadja Brykina Gallery has hosted numerous retrospectives and solo shows of the Nonconformist artists of the 1960s-80s as well as artists of the younger generation. The Foundation marked its opening with an exhibition which presents works by Vladimir Andreenkov, Francisco Infante, Alexei Kamensky, Andrey Krasulin, Boris Otarov, Sergey Potapov, and Yuri Zlotnikov to name a few – all of them are gallery artists with whom it has been working for over 20 years.
The timing of “Mini Wonders: Czech Toys Past and Present”, a touring exhibition hosted by the All-Russian Decorative Art Museum in partnership with the Czech Centre in Moscow, was darkly fortuitous. It opened in the end of 2018 to coincide with the holiday season, when traditionally more visitors including families with children, try snacking on the museums during a long vacation period over the New Year. Every year the museum offers colourful shows spotlighting antique and modern New Year tree decorations and toy design.
Muscovites have long got used that every December, the darkest month of the year, one of the city's central squares across from the Bolshoi Theatre, is brightly lit not only by a huge Christmas tree, but also by the Grand menorah traditionally installed for Hanukkah when Jews around the world celebrate the Festival of Lights and the miracle of the temple’s menorah burning brightly for eight full days. It has been over 25 years now, since it was first publically celebrated in Moscow in the 1990-s.