Editor's Column
Golden Collection
Infographics
Experts
MFA Russia News
All Tags
Archive material
April 2019 (19)
March 2019 (23)
February 2019 (28)
January 2019 (22)
December 2018 (22)
November 2018 (24)
rss
facebook
twitter
youtube

Last June, Russia's series of investment forums presented Moscow with an opportunity to unveil plans for a serious correction of its economic policies, and what seems to be at the bottom line is a radical departure from the concept of state capitalism.  It is unclear at the moment how the shift in priorities will help to improve Russia's economic climate, to make the country a magnet for investments, to boost innovations, or to launch the promised modernization, and personally I see no reasons for heightened expectations.

On June 24, at a meeting in Brussels the European Council decided for further enlargement of the European Union – on July 1, 2013 Croatia should become the 28th members of the EU.  In December the final document on the admission of Croatia to the EU is expected to be signed but before this the decision of the European Council should be approved by the parliament of each of the member states.

The arrest in Serbia of former Bosnian Serb army commander, legendary Gen. R. Mladic and the statement on the illegitimacy of Gadhafi’s rule in Libya issued collectively at the G8 summit in Deauville combine neatly within the same paradigm: in a unipolar world, as long as it continues to exist, leaders of the countries outside of the top league are not entitled to independent policies.

On the 23d of May the naval forces of the US, NATO, South Europe and North Africa launched the maneuvers codenamed Phoenix Express. Politically, the aim is to demonstrate that members of the alliance are ready to join efforts in case anything goes wrong in Libya. As far as the maneuvers themselves are concerned, training is primarily aimed to be ready to land troops no only in Libya but in Syria as well.

On April 10, in an interview with a CNN host and political observer Fareed Zakaria, the former secretary of state James Baker, when he was speaking about the current global changes, said the following: “The biggest challenge facing the U.S. isn’t turmoil in the Arab world. It’s our debt bomb”.  He said that without a strong dollar the US will turn into the United States of Greece.

The successful completion of the 5-year cycle in China coincided in time with the Chinese leader's visit to the US, highlighting the contrast between the relative trajectories of the two economies. Now that the US economy's bankruptcy is an open secret and Washington is in the process of soliciting a global relaxation of payment schedules, the West's evasiveness about the situation reflects a naïve attempt not to admit the fact that the era of the US economical dominance is basically over.

Chinese poet and historian Guo Moruo wrote in 1952: “German occupants demolished the monument to Victor Hugo in Paris in 1941. Recently, a model of the Ford plant was installed on the monument's pedestal to demonstrate the dominance of the US dollar empire. No less than the French people, we feel outraged as the act is an offense not only to the French culture, but to the culture of the entire humanity”.

The planned December 15 opening of the rouble-yuan trading in Russia is a symbolic and potentially historical event. It reflects tectonic shifts in the world's economy and politics and accordingly promises a transformation of the global financial architecture. At the moment China's contribution to the global economy far exceeds the scope of the yuan international circulation and the Chinese currency's share in national financial reserves.

Two events which had been anticipated for quite long took place in the U.S. shortly before the G20 summit in Seoul. On 2 November the Democrats lost control of the House of Representatives, and on 3 November the U.S. Federal Reserve announced that it would pump $600 billion into the US economy by the end of June 2011 in order to boost the fragile recovery.

In early November interior ministers of the EU`s 27 member states are going to discuss visa-free regime with the Balkan states. These are expected to be really hot debates with the EU chiefs probably revising the earlier approved principles and schedules. Albania and Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as Serbia and Macedonia that have been enjoying visa-free regime with the EU since 19 December 2009, are running the risk of being excluded from the list.