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The statement about a possible division of Kosovo made by the chairman of the Kosovo Assembly Jakup Krasniqi ahead of the resumption of talks between Belgrade and Pristine may give a new direction to the burning discussion on Kosovo issue.

As the tide of the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations sweeps across European cities, the impression is growing that the future holds a lot of unexpected for the EU. The protests which are carefully coordinated via social media can't but evoke memories of the recent uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East, especially since the coordinators readily cite parallels between the gatherings in Tahrir Square and Times Square.

The escalation in the Serb-populated northern part of Kosovo, paralleled by the deepening of the EU crisis, underscored the inefficiency of the efforts and approached supposed to help resolve the bitter dispute over Serbia's breakaway province. It became abundantly clear that the attempts made since late 2010 to reach compromise via technical talks between Belgrade and Pristina radicalized both parties to the conflict and put in jeopardy the fragile political balance across the Balkans rather than produced appreciable results.

The so-called ‘Arab spring’, which started as a wave of anti-government riots in Tunisia and Egypt, is now developing in full accordance with the US scenario, its main aim being to reshape the geopolitics, which the Bush administration once described as ‘The Greater Middle East’ plan.

On June 24, at a meeting in Brussels the European Council decided for further enlargement of the European Union – on July 1, 2013 Croatia should become the 28th members of the EU.  In December the final document on the admission of Croatia to the EU is expected to be signed but before this the decision of the European Council should be approved by the parliament of each of the member states.

The arrest in Serbia of former Bosnian Serb army commander, legendary Gen. R. Mladic and the statement on the illegitimacy of Gadhafi’s rule in Libya issued collectively at the G8 summit in Deauville combine neatly within the same paradigm: in a unipolar world, as long as it continues to exist, leaders of the countries outside of the top league are not entitled to independent policies.

On the 23d of May the naval forces of the US, NATO, South Europe and North Africa launched the maneuvers codenamed Phoenix Express. Politically, the aim is to demonstrate that members of the alliance are ready to join efforts in case anything goes wrong in Libya. As far as the maneuvers themselves are concerned, training is primarily aimed to be ready to land troops no only in Libya but in Syria as well.

The parliamentary elections, held in Finland on April 17, were marked by an unprecedented success of the True Finns, which is regarded as a nationalist party. According to the preliminary results, the True Finns have received 19% of votes and increased their representation at the parliament to 39 from only 5 seats in comparison with 2007.

In early November interior ministers of the EU`s 27 member states are going to discuss visa-free regime with the Balkan states. These are expected to be really hot debates with the EU chiefs probably revising the earlier approved principles and schedules. Albania and Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as Serbia and Macedonia that have been enjoying visa-free regime with the EU since 19 December 2009, are running the risk of being excluded from the list.

A new political crisis is ripening in Serbia’s Kosovo. The resignation of Kosovo’s President Fatmir Sejdiu was followed by the resignation of the government of Hashim Thaçi, which means that early parliamentary elections will be held. It also means the postponement of talks between Belgrade and Pristina and possibly a new allocation of forces in the Albanian camp.