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Chinese President Xi Jinping’s two-day state visit to North Korea, which came against the backcloth of renewed correspondence between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un attracted a great deal of attention as it was the first time in 14 years that China’s top official had arrived in Pyongyang. The talks centered on political and economic cooperation between the two countries, the situation in the region and the dialogue between North Korea and the United States. And, of course, the two leaders also discussed ways of facing up to Washington, given the recent worsening of both countries’ relations with the United States.
  • Category: Experts |
  • Date: 27-06-2019, 14:49
  • Views: 153
During a recent meeting with his South Korean counterpart Moon Jae-in at the White House, US President Donald Trump said that while a step-by-step agreement with North Korea concerning that country’s nuclear program remained on the table, his administration was still focused on “the big deal.” Trump announced plans for his third meeting with the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, but added that this would require “lengthy preparation.” The South Korean president likewise spoke about the need for the US and North Korean leaders meeting again shortly and underscored the need to maintain the current pace of negotiations.
Chinese President Xi Jinping’s recent state visits to Italy, Monaco and France set off a flurry of comments by European media, which even called Mr. Xi “Marko Polo in reverse,” who arrived in Europe to open the world to China and Chinese goods. The outcome of the Chinese leader’s visit is pretty vague and certainly gives a lot of food for afterthought for both the guests and the organizers. Still, Xi Jinping’s trip to Italy produced quite tangible and concrete results by latching Europe’s third-largest economy onto China’s “Belt and Road Initiative”.
The 2019 Security Conference in Munich attracted so much attention not only due to the top-notch lineup of participants, but also to the keynote report released by the organizers as a curtain-raiser for the high-profile gathering. Titled “The Great Puzzle: Who Will Pick Up the Pieces?" the Munich Security Report (MSR) was pitched as a recipe for preserving and strengthening the “liberal world order,” which, according to the authors, is becoming increasingly fragmented and chaotic.
Forty years after the United States and China established diplomatic relations in January 1979 the anniversary is a good reason to reflect on the past and future of their relationship. The 40th anniversary is best remembered in Beijing. In an interview devoted to the memorable date, China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi outlined his country’s vision of the experience of and lessons learned from the past decades of bilateral relations.
On December 20, South Korea’s presidential Blue House unveiled a new national security strategy - a “top-level” national security and defense policy document, which also pertains to President Moon Jae-in’s policy of reuniting with the North. Such documents are normally drawn up once every five years, but the current version appeared a year earlier due to the “significant changes” in the situation on the Korean Peninsula. What is important here, however, is just to what extent Seoul’s new strategy reflects the undoubtedly positive changes that have recently been happening in relations between the two countries.
The news about the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s decision to put off the inter-Korean summit in Seoul due to domestic political agenda gave rise to speculation that before heading to South Korea he might be willing to hold a meeting with US President Donald Trump. This means that the possible dates for the summits are shifted to January-February 2019.
  • Category: Experts |
  • Date: 19-12-2018, 13:14
  • Views: 279
Even before the ink on the comments made by those who (just like the author of these lines) saw the recent meeting between US President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping in Buenos Aires as a sign of a temporary truce in the trade war between the two countries had time to dry, something like a hostage-taking and the opening of a second front happened. The recent arrest in Canada under US pressure of Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of China’s telecommunications giant Huawei, is unfolding into a full-blown international scandal with far-reaching consequences.
The new American initiative for the creation of the Indo-Pacific Partnership (IPP) has grabbed the spotlight in many political discussions of late. Although the idea to set up such a forum was proposed at the end of 2017 and to this day has been no more than a general slogan, now the Trump administration seems set to stake on it. Why?
Trade negotiations have been increasingly used as a political tool. This is the first thing that comes to mind when one is trying to understand what is happening around the trade war unleashed by the administration of Donald Trump practically on all fronts: against the EU, China, Russia, Mexico and Canada. On the eve of a visit to Washington of the European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, Donald Trump suggested that the EU, at the same time as the USA, abandon customs duties, barriers and subsidies. He said in his Twitter account that he suggests this because they will refuse just the same ...
  • Category: Analytics |
  • Date: 6-08-2018, 14:12
  • Views: 656