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The fall of M. Gadhafi's regime will come as a huge success of the globalization forces seeking to establish a new world order. The proportions of the campaign the West launched in Libya and the level of sophistication of the technologies employed were impressive regardless of the accompanying political assessments – altogether they combined into a fundamental political initiative with far-reaching historical goals.

Wide-scale protest movements in the Middle East have not overshadowed the Afghan issue - on the contrary they have somehow clarified the state of things in Afghanistan. Now it is clear that in 2011 the situation there has become even more complicated: mass mop-up operations by US and NATO forces did not lead to the decline of Taliban and the situation is a stalemate.

The September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the New York Trade Center left the world divided. The US Administration and its giant propaganda machine made huge efforts to convince their audiences that the terrorist act had been perpetrated by Al Qaeda, but the developments that followed pointed with utmost clarity to its real authors – an influential US, British or Israeli clique which masterminded the plot to put history on their own course.

There is consensus across the expert community that a new phase of the settlement in Transnistria was energized by the June 4-5, 2010 informal meeting between Russian President D. Medvedev and German Chancellor A. Merkel in the Meseberg Castle near Berlin. The key result produced by the talks was Russia's consent to a bigger EU role in the resolution of the conflict over Transnistria or – in absolutely precise terms – to an upgrade of the EU status in the process from an observer to an active player.

According to a recent New York Times article, Human Rights Watch released materials citing cases of gross abuse by anti-Gadhafi rebels in a mountainous area located in the western part of Libya. Incidents are reported to have taken place in the towns of Qawalish, Awaniya, Rayaniyah and Zawiyat al-Bagul seized over the past month by the rebels from the government forces.

Any developments in Afghanistan and the adjacent region should be interpreted within a wider picture of Washington's geopolitical project known as the Greater Middle East, the plan to set up a Greater Pashtunistan being an integral part of the design. The idea predictably struck a cord with a considerable fraction of the Pashtun elite, while the Pashtunization of the Afghan administration, the process originally launched by H. Karzai's inner circle and independently gaining momentum ever since, is alarming and alienating the non-Pashtun part of Afghanistan's population.

In mid June Alan Greenspan, former Federal Reserve chairman, said a default by Greece is “almost certain” and could help drive the US economy into recession. 

Greenspan’s loud statement on Greece may be a “sound curtain” to prepare the global community to a default by the US.

In mid May the president of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan A.A. Zardari visited Russia. Probably this visit will define the development of the Russian-Pakistani future in the near future and the development of political processes in South Asia and the nearby territories.

The arrest of the head of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Dominique Strauss-Kahn onboard of the plane ten minutes before flying to Paris from New York shook the global mass media not less than the elimination of terrorist N 1 Osama bin laden in Pakistan. Does it mean that both of them, each in his own right, posed the same danger for the United States?

A conference on Libya convened in London on March 29 and was attended by representatives from 40 countries which had voted for UN Security Council Resolution 1973. The panel included such dignitaries as UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, his Libya envoy Abdul Ilah Khatib, NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen, US Secretary of State H. Clinton, French foreign minister Alain Juppé, etc.