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The Anglo-Saxon globalization ran into a major roadblock: at the moment the Egyptian regime which the West has propped up for decades is on the verge of collapse. Even if Mubarak's nominee Omar Suleiman manages to cling on, the global centers of power will have to face a different reality in Egypt.

A week-long referendum over what is becoming the biggest divorce between African nations in a decade ended in Sudan on January 1. The country's conflict along ethnic and religious lines unfolded for ages. Sudan is split into two distinct parts by the so-far virtual border between the Arab-dominated North and the tribal South where much of the African population was – perhaps without genuine immersion into the new faith – led to convert to Christianity by Western missionaries.

On January 1, 2011 Cubans will celebrate the 52nd anniversary of the revolution that opened the era of social justice in Latin America. Today's political dynamics across the continent – the radical reforms in Venezuela and Ecuador, the nationally oriented politics pursued by Argentine, Brazil, and several other countries – was made possible by the example of Cuba, the country which did not bow to the US pressure.

The trouble is that the practice of Berlin and Paris does not meet the principles of EU’s expansion and making the levels of its members’ development equal. That is why either the principles or the line-up of the EU should change. And again Berlin and Paris will decide on it.

Considering that the hope to crush the resistance of radical groups in Afghanistan is not materializing while the scheduled withdrawal of the Western coalition from the country is drawing closer, Russia is left with no other option but to take a bigger role in tackling the Afghan and the wider regional problems. A potential strategy in the context is to build a coalition based on the already existing blocs, namely the Collective Security Treaty Organization and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization.

Russian president D. Medvedev will visit Delhi on December 21-22. Russia and India share a decades-long record of strategic partnership, and – considering that the relations between the two countries will largely shape the configuration of the emerging post-unipolar world order - the two heavyweights' contacts are drawing attention worldwide.

On November 23, the German newspaper Die Welt wrote: “Hopes that euro will unite the society have failed”. On the contrary, the gap between the countries, which earlier had unstable currencies, and the countries, which were heading to stability, has become wider.

Several days since the Seoul G20 summit, the majority of comments are quite reasonably displaying a total lack of optimism.

The forum passed the Seoul declaration, churned out several other documents, and generated an initiative to establish a global financial security network mostly based on the IMF mechanisms.

The NATO forces aren’t going anywhere from Afghanistan. They will remain in the Hindu Kush for as long as it takes. Richard Holbrooke, United States Special Representative for AfPak is on record that the Lisbon summit will have on its agenda no exit strategy for Afghanistan but rather a mere “transition” plan. He announced that the US’ combat mission will not end until 2014.

Recent political developments in the EU show that certain forces in Europe and the US are implementing in the western part of Eurasia a New Atlantism project aligned with the US plan for the game on the Grand Chessboard.

Ideologically, Atlantim is premised in the assumption that the US should achieve global dominance. The ideology is better known as Euro-Atlantism or trans-Atlantism in Europe.