Minister Sergey Lavrov
Editor's Column
Golden Collection
Experts
MFA Russia News
All Tags
Archive material
November 2018 (15)
October 2018 (28)
September 2018 (8)
August 2018 (11)
July 2018 (4)
June 2018 (3)
rss
facebook
twitter
youtube

On November 6, Nicaraguan president Daniel Ortega was re-elected winning 64 % of votes. The key points of his election program are laconic and comprehensible for Nicaraguan people: socialism, Christianity, free market. Ortega’s opponents have failed to come up with a more convincing alternative. His closest rival - an 80 year-old (!) Fabio Gadea from the Independent Liberal Party - received 29 % of votes. The preliminary results show that Sandinistas and their supporters will prevail in the new parliament.

A decade ago, the World Trade Center was destroyed in “a terrorist attack” on September 11 in New York. Contrary to all efforts made by the Empire's propaganda and (dis)information machine, the belief in the complicity of hawks from G. Bush's Administration in the whole story did not recede from public discourse but, instead, gained tens of millions of followers worldwide...

On March 31, a group of developing countries — Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, Cuba, Nicaragua, Cambodia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Mali, Equatorial Guinea, etc. - called the UN Security Council to impose a ceasefire on Libya and to take urgent steps to settle the conflict in and around the country. Talks between M. Gadhafi and the rebels are supposed to be the first phase of the peace process.

Among other revelations, WikiLeaks exposed the US Department of State's plans for a color revolution in Cuba. The agency's report epitomizing the genre describes a coordination forum of Cuba's three top opposition groups counting a total of 63 members. It convened in the office of the political department of the US Interests Section in Havana under the oversight of the Section staff.

The collection of US diplomatic cables published by WikiLeaks includes some 20,000 documents pertaining to Latin America. Roughly 13,000 of them came to the US Department of State from the US embassies in Mexico, Brasilia, Buenos Aires, Lima, Santiago de Chile, and Bogota, while the remaining 7,000 originated from Caracas, Quito, La Paz, and Managua. Dates on the majority of the documents fit into the last decade.

The majority of polls picked Dilma Rousseff as the frontrunner on the eve of the presidential runoff in Brazil. Brazil's outgoing president Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva, a hyper-popular leader whose rating at the final stage of the term in office topped 80%, strengthened Rousseff's bid for presidency by reiterating that voting for Dilma was in fact the same as voting for him.

Paraguay's current president Fernando Lugo used to be known as "the bishop of the poor". He made a fairly quick career in the Roman Catholic church's hierarchy, became a bishop, and later was overwhelmingly voted in as the country's president. Inaugurated on August 15, 2008, he planned to bring profound changes to Paraguay including a departure from his predecessor's markedly ruinous neoliberal course and an alliance with the populist leaders seeking to build the XXI century socialism.

These days, Mexico is increasingly often added to the list of failed states. The country started to spiral downwards following the signing of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) which exposed its economy, finances, and trade to the devastating pressure from the US. Mexico's industry and agricultural sector are overwhelmed by the flow of imports supplied by the country's northern partner, the result being a tide of bankruptcies after which masses of people are forced to turn to the criminal underworld for survival.

It seemed suspicious recently that Washington which tends to denigrate the “immature” democracies of Latin America and the Caribbean without restraint made serious efforts to demonstrate respect for Brazil. G. Bush's Administration bracketed as “immature” the Latin American states with populist regimes and, generally, any countries showing a measure of defiance defending their national interests under the US pressure.

Ecuador's police forces played the key role in the coup attempt which shattered the country on September 30. The passing of a law affecting the police officers' bonuses and job benefits became a pretext for the rebellion which erupted in the capital city of Quito and the Guayquil seaport town. Actually, the law was not supposed to entail pay reductions, but those who masterminded the coup managed to convince the police that it would and thus provoked the uprising.